AEG Presents

Trevor Hall with The California Honeydrops and Bay Ledges AT RED ROCKS

All Ages
Sunday, April 30
Doors: 5:30pm | Show: 6:30pm
Raised on an island in South Carolina, singer/songwriter Trevor Hall realized at a young age that music was more than just a passion - it was, rather, his life’s art. At sixteen, he recorded his first album, soon after which he left South Carolina for Idyllwild Arts Academy in California where he studied classical guitar and was introduced to the practices of yoga and meditation, which would greatly influence his life and his music. Hall’s music, a blend of roots and folk music, is imbued with a deep love of Eastern Mysticism. This powerful symbiosis fostered a deep connectivity with his growing fan base and Trevor quickly matured into a leader of the burgeoning conscious musical community. Along with numerous pilgrimages to India, he has also completed a series of sold-out tours and collaborations with artists such as Steel Pulse, Ziggy Marley, Jimmy Cliff, Michael Franti, Xavier Rudd, John Butler Trio, Matisyahu and Nahko & Medicine for the People. THE FRUITFUL DARKNESS was Trevor’s first independent release — supported by his fans known as THE VILLAGERS — became the #1 Music campaign of its kind in 2017 — after a decade plus recording for established labels such as Geffen and Vanguard. Besides the change in infrastructure, the album itself explores completely new sonic terrain and was released unconventionally, in 3-5 song installments on specific lunar dates. THE FRUITFUL DARKNESS Full Length Album officially released on June 1st, 2018 and premiered at #4 on the iTunes Alternative Charts. His previous full-length album releases, Chapter of the Forest (2014) and KALA (2015), debuted at #3 and #2 on the iTunes singer/songwriter chart respectively and were supported by extensive tours around the US and Australia. Beyond his intention to spread love and healing through music, Hall also collects donations to support children’s education in India and has continuously donated to charities and relief funds.
The California Honeydrops celebrate their 10th year together with the release of their 7th studio album and first ever double album, “Call It Home: Vol. 1 & 2” and continue to perform worldwide. Led by dynamic vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Lech Wierzynski, and drawing on diverse musical influences from Bay Area R&B, funk, Southern soul, Delta blues, and New Orleans second-line, the Honeydrops bring vibrant energy and infectious dance-party vibes to their shows. In 2016 & 2017 the Honeydrops were honored to support Bonnie Raitt on her North America release tour—and in the past have been privileged to support the likes of B.B. King, Allen Toussaint, Buddy Guy, and Dr. John. Whether in those high-profile performances or in more intimate venues where the band itself can leave the stage and get down on the dance floor, the California Honeydrops’ shared vision and purpose remain: to make the audience dance and sing.The Honeydrops have come a long way since guitarist and trumpeter Lech Wierzynkski and drummer Ben Malament started busking in an Oakland subway station, but the band has stayed true to that organic, street-level feel. Listening to Lech sing, it can be a surprise that he was born in Warsaw, Poland, and raised by Polish political refugees. He learned his vocal stylings from contraband American recordings of Sam Cooke, Ray Charles, and Louis Armstrong, and later at Oberlin College and on the club circuit in Oakland, California. With the additions of Johnny Bones on tenor sax and clarinet, Lorenzo Loera on keyboards, and Beau Bradbury on bass, they’ve built a powerful full-band sound to support Wierzynski’s vocals. More like parties than traditional concerts, their shows feature extensive off-stage jamming and crowd interaction. “The whole point is to erase the boundaries between the crowd and us,” Wierzynski says. “We don’t make setlists. We want requests. We want crowd involvement, to make people become a part of the whole thing by dancing along, singing, picking the songs and generally coming out of their shells.”
The breakthrough single from Bay Ledges, "Safe" came to life in a moment of major creative upheaval. After spending few years in New York City, musician Zach Hurd took off for L.A., got a job at a restaurant in Venice, and put his music career on the backburner. While crashing at his sister Georgia's place, he soon began writing and recording on his own as a way to reconnect with the pure joy he'd found in making music as a kid."I'd come home from work and record these songs and not really even think about releasing them, since they were so different from the heavier, more acoustic stuff I'd done before," says Hurd. "It was just something to do for fun and to explore, without ever laboring over anything. The only goal was to get out of my own way and make songs that felt good to me."Sunny yet soulful, warmly textured and sweetly melodic, "Safe" was sparked by the newfound sense of possibility that Hurd discovered in moving to L.A. "It's a love song, but there's a bigger theme of meeting people who seem in touch with the magic of creating, especially the idea of creating just to create," Hurd points out. With its heart-on-sleeve sensibility, "Safe" reveals the delicate contrast at the heart of Bay Ledges, embodying both a carefree spirit and powerful depth.In November 2016, at the urging of his sisters and friends, Hurd released "Safe" online but made no effort to promote it. Within weeks, the track landed on Spotify's Fresh Finds playlist, then shot up the Global Viral chart. "At the time I was in Williamsburg, Virginia, helping to clear out my grandparents' old house," recalls Hurd, who's originally from Bath, Maine. "Every day I'd wake up to something new. It was so surreal -- like, 'This unbelievable thing is happening, and I'm in Colonial Williamsburg and there's no one to celebrate with.'" With "Safe" drawing attention from a host of record labels, Hurd soon signed with S- Curve Records and has been preparing for the release of Bay Ledges' debut EP.Borrowing the name Bay Ledges from a plot of land his grandparents owned in the Maine woods, Hurd grew up on the Paul Simon and Beach Boys and Aretha Franklin records his parents spun at home. But while he started playing guitar in middle school and writing songs in his early teens, he mostly kept his music to himself. "I was terrified to sing in front of anyone, so I was always secretive about it," says Hurd. It wasn't until his senior year of college that he began sharing his songs with the world. "One night we were all hanging out in the dorm and one of my friends asked me to play something," says Hurd. "He was like, 'Zach, we all hear you playing in your room all the time -- just play us a song.' I remember pulling the hood of my sweatshirt down over my eyes and being so embarrassed, and then when I was done they all burst out laughing, like, 'Dude, that was amazing!' It was just a side of me they'd never seen before."After that night, Hurd began playing open-mic nights in Providence and -- once he'd graduated -- touring the country in a singer/songwriter duo. Eventually settling in New York, he then dedicated himself to developing his career as a solo artist, a venture that included winning the International Independent Music Awards' Best Pop EP prize for 2013's She Never Sleeps.Now at work on the EP from Bay Ledges, Hurd has made a point of sticking to the uncalculated approach he brought to the making of "Safe." "I used to get so focused on trying to express things in a poetic way, I'd end up not really saying anything at all," he says. "This is the first time I've been able to stop myself from self-editing in my attempt to please others." With Bay Ledges evolving from a passion project to a fully realized musical outfit (also featuring vocals from sister Georgia), that lack of self-editing has served a higher purpose for Hurd. "It's easy to get caught up in trying to come off a certain way," he says. "Making this music lets me connect with myself. Throughout the creative process, I have to check in and make sure I'm not giving in to any pressure, and just go with the songs that are coming out of me, because those are the most honest. It's difficult sometimes, but it's also so freeing and so much more fun that way."
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